The college entrance rate fell for the first time in a decade after a record drop in A-level grades

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The college entrance rate fell for the first time in a decade after a record drop in A-level grades

  • Figures reveal misery caused by compression of places after record drop in grades
  • The enrollment rate this year was 37.4%, compared to 38.2% in 2021
  • Over the weekend there were 40,490 unplaced applicants, down from 29,400 last year
  • It comes after 43,000 people went into compensation on results day – the highest in a decade

The university entry rate of school leavers fell for the first time in a decade.

New figures reveal the full extent of the misery caused by the compression of places after a record drop in grades.

The statistics, taken from dataHE, show the inflow rate was 37.4%, down from 38.2% in 2021 and the first drop since 2012. The inflow rate is defined as “the proportion of the population that go to university”.

As the clearing is open for at least another month, the current inflow rate could change, but is still expected to be lower than last year. The data was collected from live counts more than a week after results day.

An increase in the 18-year-old population and an effort by universities to reduce the number have combined to create the most competitive admissions cycle ever.

Over the weekend, the number of unplaced applicants stood at 40,490 – or 13.2% – compared to 29,400 or 10.1% last year.

It comes after 43,000 people entered compensation on results day, the highest in a decade.

Mark Corver, co-founder of dataHE, described the drop in entry rate this year as “very unusual”.

New statistics show the college entrance rate has fallen for the first time in a decade. Pictured: Nottingham Trent University Compensation Call Center

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